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[Previous entry: "WBD & mouse"] [Next entry: "Barry" ]

Profit & loss

4 March 2006

Further to my notes on losing a cat and discovering a mouse: that seems to have become the pattern of my life, just suddenly. Lose a pound and find a penny, and like that.

A publisher who had seemed enthusiastic has flipped over and said no to a pet project, that I was rather counting on - but someone I respect mightily expresses an unexpected enthusiasm for a short story. Doesnít mean sheíll use it, but she enthuses none the less - and thatís science fiction, please note, and the first time I have dipped my toe in that particular pool for, ooh, about thirty years or so.

And I had friends around yesterday who addressed themselves to various issues with my system; and the scanner cannot be made to work at all, and the graphics driver bewilderingly couldnít be configured (and indeed half my software keeps insisting that the hardware is better, smarter, faster than it should be) - but the printer is now working properly, energetically, as eagerly in Linux as in Windows, and thatís all score.

And Iíve spent the last twenty-four hours feeling lousy, and am clearly just at the messiest & most antisocial point of a cold; so have just cancelled all my fun this weekend. I was meant to be off for a sleepover tonight and then out again for lunch tomorrow, and thence to a concert after; but Iíd be disgusting company and unpleasantly infectious, so I shall stay indoors on my own instead. But that does mean that I get the chance to work at least a little through the weekend, on and off; and during the off times it means I get to read more George R R Martin, and to watch a little TV. Like, fírexample, Iíve just been watching ĎGentlemen Prefer Blondesí, and thatís a hundred minutes of happiness, right there...


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© Chaz Brenchley 2006
Reproduced here by permission of Chaz Brenchley, who asserts his moral right to be identified as the author of this work.